Living With Epilepsy

Education and Employment

By law, people living with epilepsy or other handicaps in the United States cannot be denied employment or access to any educational, recreational, or other activity because of their seizures. However, one survey showed that only about 56 percent of people living with epilepsy finish high school and about 15 percent finish college -- rates much lower than those for the general population. The same survey found that about 25 percent of working-age people with epilepsy are unemployed.
 
These numbers indicate that significant barriers still exist for people living with epilepsy in school and work. Restrictions on driving limit the employment opportunities for many people with epilepsy, and many find it difficult to face the misunderstandings and social pressures they encounter in public situations. Antiepileptic drugs also may cause side effects that interfere with concentration and memory.
 
Children living with epilepsy may need extra time to complete schoolwork, and they sometimes may need to have instructions or other information repeated for them. Teachers should be told what to do if a child in their classroom has a seizure, and parents should work with the school system to find reasonable ways to accommodate any special needs their child may have.
 
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Epilepsy Treatment

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