Epilepsy and Pregnancy

What to Do During Pregnancy

Women with epilepsy who discover that they are pregnant but have not already spoken with their healthcare provider about ways to reduce the risks should do so as soon as possible; however, they should continue taking medication as prescribed until that time to avoid preventable seizures.
 
Seizures during pregnancy can harm the developing baby or lead to miscarriage, particularly if the seizures are severe. Nevertheless, many women who have seizures during pregnancy have normal, healthy babies.
 
Women with epilepsy sometimes experience a change in their seizure frequency during pregnancy, even if they do not change medications. About 25 to 40 percent of women have an increase in their seizures while they are pregnant, while other women may have fewer seizures during pregnancy. The frequency of seizures during pregnancy may be influenced by a variety of factors, including the woman's increased blood volume during pregnancy, which can dilute the effect of medications.
 
Women should have their blood levels of seizure medications monitored closely during and after pregnancy, and the medication dosage should be adjusted accordingly.
 
Pregnant women with epilepsy should take prenatal vitamins and get plenty of sleep to avoid seizures caused by sleep deprivation. They also should take vitamin K supplements after 34 weeks of pregnancy to reduce the risk of a blood-clotting disorder in infants called neonatal coagulopathy. This condition can occur as a result of fetal exposure to epilepsy medications. Finally, they should get good prenatal care; avoid tobacco, caffeine, alcohol, and illegal drugs; and try to avoid stress.
 

How Epilepsy Can Affect Labor and Delivery

Labor and delivery usually proceed normally for women with epilepsy, although there is a slightly increased risk of hemorrhage, eclampsia, premature labor, and cesarean section. Doctors can administer antiepileptic drugs intravenously and monitor blood levels of anticonvulsant medication during labor to reduce the risk of the labor triggering a seizure.
 
Babies sometimes have symptoms of withdrawal from the mother's seizure medication after they are born, but these problems wear off in a few weeks or months and usually do not cause serious or long-term effects. A mother's blood levels of anticonvulsant medication should be checked frequently after delivery, as medication often needs to be decreased.
 
Epilepsy medications need not influence a woman's decision about breastfeeding her baby. Only minor amounts of these medications are secreted in breast milk, usually not enough to harm the baby and much less than the baby was exposed to in the womb. On rare occasions, the baby may become excessively drowsy or feed poorly, and these problems should be closely monitored. However, experts believe the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh the risks except in rare circumstances.
 
Pregnancy and Pain

Pregnancy and Other Medical Conditions

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