Epilepsy Articles A-Z

Epilepsy Symptoms - How Does Topamax Work?

This page contains links to eMedTV Epilepsy Articles containing information on subjects from Epilepsy Symptoms to How Does Topamax Work?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Epilepsy Symptoms
    Blackouts and involuntary arm and leg movements are possible epilepsy symptoms. As this eMedTV article explains, perhaps the most well-known symptom is a convulsive seizure. However, this article describes several signs and symptoms of the condition.
  • Epilepsy Treatment
    A wide range of treatment options for epilepsy are available, as this eMedTV article explains. This includes medications, surgery, and even dietary changes in some cases. This segment takes a closer look at this topic, with a link to learn more.
  • Epilepsy Treatments
    Examples of epilepsy treatments include medications, surgery, and a ketogenic diet. This eMedTV article offers an overview of several treatments for this condition and stresses the importance of accurate diagnosis in determining proper management.
  • Epilepsy Types
    Temporal lobe epilepsy, absence epilepsy, and neocortical epilepsy are just a few of the forms of epilepsy. This eMedTV article offers descriptions of many of the various epilepsy types, including information on the types seen primarily in children.
  • Epileptie
    Epilepsy is a disorder that causes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness known as seizures. This eMedTV segment explores the causes of epilepsy and describes the effects of this condition. Epileptie is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epilipsy
    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder caused by misfiring neurons in the brain. This page of the eMedTV library briefly describes the condition and offers a link to more information. Epilipsy is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epitol
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Epitol to treat epileptic seizures or trigeminal neuralgia. This eMedTV article further discusses the uses of this prescription drug and lists some of its side effects and general precautions and warnings.
  • Epitol Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the starting Epitol dosage for treating epilepsy in adults and children over 12 years of age is 200 mg twice daily. This page also discusses Epitol dosing for trigeminal neuralgia and offers tips on taking the drug.
  • Epitol Drug Information
    This page of the eMedTV archives provides information on Epitol, a drug used to treat epilepsy as well as trigeminal neuralgia. This segment explains how often this product is taken and what you should discuss with your doctor prior to taking it.
  • Felbatol
    Felbatol is a drug prescribed to treat partial seizures in adults and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in children. This eMedTV page offers a detailed overview of this medicine, including information on how it works, general dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • Felbatol and Breastfeeding
    In general, women should avoid using Felbatol (felbamate) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV Web article explains why most healthcare providers will not recommend this drug while nursing and describes the potentially serious problems it may cause.
  • Felbatol and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to take Felbatol (felbamate) during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web resource provides an in-depth discussion on this topic, including the results of animal studies and why the FDA considers the drug a pregnancy Category C medicine.
  • Felbatol Dosage
    People typically start with a low dose of Felbatol, which is then increased slowly as necessary. This eMedTV Web segment provides an in-depth look at dosing guidelines in adults and children, and lists tips for when and how to effectively take Felbatol.
  • Felbatol Drug Interactions
    Medications such as phenytoin or carbamazepine may cause negative drug interactions with Felbatol. This eMedTV segment features a list of other drugs that can lead to negative interactions and also explains the complications that could result.
  • Felbatol Medication Information
    Felbatol is an epilepsy medicine prescribed for partial seizures and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This eMedTV page provides some important information on this medication, including potential side effects, as well as some safety precautions to be aware of.
  • Felbatol Overdose
    As with many medications, it is possible to take too much Felbatol (felbamate). This eMedTV Web segment discusses what to expect with a Felbatol overdose, including information on how a healthcare provider will treat any symptoms that occur as a result.
  • Felbatol Side Effects
    Insomnia, heartburn, and vomiting are some of the most common Felbatol side effects. This eMedTV Web resource further describes other problems reported with the drug, including other common side effects and those that require immediate medical care.
  • Felbatol Uses
    Felbatol is prescribed for treating partial seizures and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This eMedTV page offers more information on what Felbatol is used for, including information on its safety in children and whether there are any off-label uses of the drug.
  • Felbatol Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely take Felbatol if you have liver disease or certain blood disorders. This eMedTV article offers a list of other important precautions and warnings with Felbatol, and also covers what to tell your doctor before taking it.
  • Felbitol
    Felbatol is a prescription seizure medicine used to treat specific types of seizures in adults and children. This eMedTV page describes these particular uses and lists potential side effects of the drug. Felbitol is a common misspelling of Felbatol.
  • Ficompa
    Adults and adolescents who have partial-onset seizures may receive Fycompa. This eMedTV article examines this prescription medication in more detail and covers some dosing tips and when this drug is prescribed. Ficompa is a common misspelling of Fycompa.
  • Fycompa
    As a prescription anti-seizure drug, Fycompa is approved for partial seizures in adults and adolescents. This eMedTV article contains more details on several topics relating to this drug, including how it works, how to take it, and potential side effects.
  • Fycompa Alternatives
    Luminal, Lyrica, and Sabril are some of the various anti-seizure drugs that are Fycompa alternatives. This eMedTV page lists a number of other alternatives that may be used if Fycompa is not adequately controlling your seizures or is causing side effects.
  • Fycompa and Breastfeeding
    As discussed in this page from the eMedTV Web site, Fycompa (perampanel) should be used with caution while breastfeeding. This resource takes an in-depth look at whether this drug passes through breast milk and the potential risks it may cause.
  • Fycompa and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment addresses the potential risks of using Fycompa (perampanel) during pregnancy. This includes information on the animal research that has been done and when a healthcare provider may prescribe this drug to pregnant women.
  • Fycompa Dosage
    This part of the eMedTV Web library explains that other medications may affect your dosage of Fycompa. This article examines recommendations for how this anti-seizure drug is taken and lists some helpful tips for ensuring a safe treatment.
  • Fycompa Drug Information
    As a type of anti-seizure medicine, Fycompa can help treat partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. This eMedTV segment takes a look at this prescription drug, including dosing information and details on important safety warnings.
  • Fycompa Drug Interactions
    Oral contraceptives, antidepressants, and some anti-seizure drugs may react with Fycompa. This eMedTV segment examines how interactions with Fycompa may lead to dangerous side effects or other problems. It also lists several products you should avoid.
  • Fycompa Overdose
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains how an overdose on Fycompa (perampanel) may cause aggression, agitation, and dizziness. Other possible effects are listed, as well as treatment options that your healthcare provider might use.
  • Fycompa Side Effects
    As detailed in this eMedTV Web page, some potential Fycompa side effects include nausea, irritability, and fatigue. This article features an in-depth list of reactions to this anti-seizure drug, including those that require immediate medical attention.
  • Fycompa Uses
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Fycompa is an anti-seizure drug used in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. This page explores when this medication is prescribed and how it works to prevent abnormal brain activity.
  • Fycompa Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV segment explains, you may have an increased risk for developing complications while taking Fycompa if you have depression, liver disease, or other medical issues. This page provides other warnings and precautions when using Fycompa.
  • Gabatril
    Gabitril is a drug that is used to control partial seizures in people with epilepsy. This portion of the eMedTV library offers an overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Gabatril is a common misspelling of Gabitril.
  • Gabatrol
    Gabitril is a prescription drug used for controlling partial seizures in people with epilepsy. This eMedTV segment explains what you should tell your healthcare provider before using this seizure medicine. Gabatrol is a common misspelling of Gabitril.
  • Gabitril
    Gabitril is a drug that is used for the treatment of a certain type of seizure. This segment of the eMedTV Web site provides an in-depth look at the drug, with information on its effects, dosing guidelines, available strengths, and more.
  • Gabitril Alternatives
    Gabitril alternatives include other seizure medications, surgery, and a special diet. This eMedTV page offers in-depth information on the other seizure medications that can be used as alternatives to Gabitril and explains when they are considered.
  • Gabitril and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Gabitril passes through human breast milk. This eMedTV segment discusses Gabitril and breastfeeding, explaining the importance of talking to your doctor about taking the drug while breastfeeding in your particular situation.
  • Gabitril and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth is a possible side effect of Gabitril, occurring in only a small percentage of people taking it. This eMedTV resource further discusses Gabitril and dry mouth, including information on things you can try at home to improve your symptoms.
  • Gabitril and Insomnia
    In clinical studies, insomnia was reported by up to 6 percent of people taking Gabitril. This eMedTV article discusses Gabitril and insomnia, including a description of what insomnia is, as well as helpful tips on getting a better night's sleep.
  • Gabitril and Pregnancy
    Due to problems in animal studies, Gabitril is classified as a pregnancy Category C medication. This page on the eMedTV Web site discusses Gabitril and pregnancy, noting some of the specific problems caused by the drug in studies on pregnant animals.
  • Gabitril Dosage
    In many cases, people are started with a low Gabitril dosage and slowly increased up to an effective one. This eMedTV selection talks about Gabitril dosing, including helpful suggestions on when and how to take this seizure medication.
  • Gabitril Drug Interactions
    Medications such as Dilantin and Mysoline can interact with Gabitril. This eMedTV page offers a list of several Gabitril drug interactions. This article also describes some of the potentially negative effects that can occur as a result.
  • Gabitril Medication Information
    Are you looking for information on Gabitril? This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of this epilepsy medication, with details on the type of epilepsy it is approved for, how many times a day it is taken, and more.
  • Gabitril Overdose
    Symptoms of a Gabitril overdose include agitation, speech problems, and hostility. This eMedTV Web page deals with the effects and treatment of an overdose of this drug, including what to do if you think you may have taken too much Gabitril.
  • Gabitril Side Effects
    Common side effects of Gabitril include dizziness, shakiness, and weakness, among other things. This eMedTV page offers a detailed list of common and rare Gabitril side effects, including the ones that need to be reported immediately to your doctor.
  • Gabitril Uses
    Gabitril (tiagabine) is used to treat epilepsy in people who experience a certain type of seizure. This eMedTV article offers a detailed overview of Gabitril uses, including off-label uses of the drug (such as for the treatment of migraines).
  • Gabitril Warnings and Precautions
    As with all seizure medications, Gabitril should not be stopped suddenly. This eMedTV page provides a list of several Gabitril warnings and precautions, including information on those who should avoid the drug and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Gabitril Withdrawal
    To reduce the risk of withdrawal symptoms, slowly weaning yourself off Gabitril is recommended. This eMedTV page explains how suddenly stopping the drug increases your risk of seizures and offers suggestions on limiting Gabitril withdrawal.
  • Gabitril Withdrawl
    This eMedTV Web page explains that stopping Gabitril too quickly can cause seizures to become worse, making it very important that you not stop the medication too abruptly. Gabitril withdrawl is a common misspelling of Gabitril withdrawal.
  • Gabitrol
    Gabitril is a prescription medication approved to treat partial epileptic seizures. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses Gabitril uses in more detail and lists potential side effects of the drug. Gabitrol is a common misspelling of Gabitril.
  • Generic Banzel
    A patent prevents any generic versions of Banzel (rufinamide) from being made until 2020. This eMedTV page explains circumstances that could affect the date when generic Banzel will become available.
  • Generic Carbatrol
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, generic Carbatrol (carbamazepine) is now available. This resource lists the strengths in which it is sold and explains how it compares to the brand-name product.
  • Generic Diastat
    As this eMedTV page explains, a generic version of Diastat (diazepam rectal gel) is now available. This article further explores this topic and explains what is meant by the term "authorized generic."
  • Generic Dilantin
    Generic Dilantin is available in many forms and strengths. This eMedTV segment describes generic Dilantin in more detail and explains whether the generic products are equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Felbatol
    At this time, generic versions of Felbatol (felbamate) products are available. This eMedTV Web explains which forms of the drug are sold as generics and explains how they compare to the brand-name medication.
  • Generic for Tranzene
    Generic Tranxene, as this eMedTV page explains, is currently available in immediate-release form only. An explanation of how the FDA rates generic drugs is also included. Generic for Tranzene is a common misspelling of generic for Tranxene.
  • Generic Fycompa
    There are no generic Fycompa (perampanel) products available at this time. This eMedTV Web page discusses when this situation might change. It also explains the difference between a generic name and generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Gabitril
    As this eMedTV article explains, Gabitril's first patents have already expired, but no generic versions are available. This page takes a look at the possible reasons behind this and explains when the next patent expires.
  • Generic Keppra
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Keppra is currently available in three strengths. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at the generic version of this drug, including how it compares to brand-name Keppra.
  • Generic Keppra XR
    This eMedTV page explains that generic versions of Keppra XR (levetiracetam XR) are currently available. This article also covers how the FDA has determined that the generic versions are equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Klonopin
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Klonopin is available as a tablet and orally disintegrating tablets. This article lists the various strengths of the generic versions and explains why the FDA considers them equivalent to brand-name Klonopin.
  • Generic Lamictal
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Lamictal is available in a number of strengths and is made by several different companies. This article offers more information on the generic versions of this drug.
  • Generic Lamictal XR
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are currently no generic versions of Lamictal XR. This page discusses this topic in detail, including information on when a generic version could become available and how lamotrigine compares to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Lyrica
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the patent for Lyrica (pregabalin) expired in October 2013, but generic versions aren't expected to be produced for a few more years. This article takes a look at why this is the case.
  • Generic Neurontin
    This eMedTV resource takes a detailed look at generic Neurontin. It describes the strengths and forms available and also lists some of the companies that produce the drug. An explanation of how the FDA rates generic drugs is also provided.
  • Generic Onfi
    There are no generic Onfi (clobazam) products available at this time. This eMedTV segment gives details on when a generic version might become available and explains that clobazam is a "generic name" for Onfi, not a generic version of it.
  • Generic Oxtellar XR
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, a patent currently prevents generic Oxtellar XR (oxcarbazepine extended-release) from being made. This article takes a closer look at this topic, including when a generic version may become available.
  • Generic Peganone
    There are currently no generic Peganone (ethotoin) products available, even though the patents have expired. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at why companies may not be choosing to make a generic version of this older seizure medication.
  • Generic Phenytek
    There are currently no generic Phenytek products on the market. This eMedTV resource explains that manufacturers have chosen not to make a generic Phenytek at this time. This article also discusses possible reasons why there is no generic Phenytek.
  • Generic Potiga
    There are no generic Potiga (ezogabine) products available at this time. This article from the eMedTV Web library explains why companies have not been able to make a generic version of this drug and estimates when a generic might be available.
  • Generic Sabril
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web library, no generic Sabril (vigabatrin) products are currently available. This article explains why a company may not be able to make a generic version of this medication until August 2014.
  • Generic Stavzor
    Currently, there are no generic Stavzor (delayed release valproic acid) drugs licensed for sale. This eMedTV segment explores why generic versions of the medicine are not available and explains whether valproic acid is the same as generic Stavzor.
  • Generic Tegretol
    Generic Tegretol is available in tablet and liquid form. This eMedTV page describes the various forms and strengths of generic Tegretol and explains why the FDA has assigned them an "AB" rating.
  • Generic Topamax
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Topamax tablets are currently available in four strengths. This article talks about the generic versions of this drug in more detail, including how they compare to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Tranxene
    This segment from the eMedTV archives offers a detailed look at generic Tranxene. It explains that it is only available in immediate-release form, lists available strengths and companies who make it, and also explains how the FDA rates generic drugs.
  • Generic Trileptal
    This eMedTV article explains that generic Trileptal is currently available in a number of strengths. Also included in this article are the companies who manufacture generic Trileptal and a brief overview of the testing process for generic drugs.
  • Generic Vimpat
    Patents currently prevent any generic Vimpat (lacosamide) from being manufactured. This eMedTV page explains when a generic version may become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Zarontin
    Generic Zarontin, which comes in both capsule and syrup form, is made by several companies. This eMedTV resource highlights the available strengths of the generic drug and explains why generic forms of Zarontin are as good as the brand-name version.
  • Generic Zonegran
    Generic Zonegran is currently available in three strengths. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at generic Zonegran, including information on how the generic version of the drug compares to the brand-name version.
  • Genes and Epilepsy
    Scientists studying genes and epilepsy found at least twelve forms of epilepsy to have some genetic basis. This eMedTV article explores the latest research into genes and epilepsy, including the development of more effective anticonvulsant treatment.
  • How Does Diazepam Work?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, diazepam works to treat several conditions by enhancing the naturally calming effects of a certain brain chemical. This page further discusses the effects of this medication and what it is approved to treat.
  • How Does Klonopin Work?
    Klonopin is an effective treatment for panic disorder and epilepsy, but how does Klonopin work? As this eMedTV Web page explains, Klonopin works in the brain by enhancing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a naturally calming brain chemical.
  • How Does Lamictal Work?
    It is not yet understood how Lamictal works to treat bipolar disorder or epilepsy. However, as this eMedTV page explains, the drug may work by affecting sodium channels in the brain. A link to more in-depth information is also included.
  • How Does Lyrica Work?
    As this segment from the eMedTV library explains, it is not known exactly how Lyrica works for nerve pain, fibromyalgia, or partial seizures. The drug may work by binding to certain calcium channels in the central nervous system.
  • How Does Neurontin Work?
    How does Neurontin work? It is not exactly clear how this drug works to treat nerve pain or epilepsy. As this eMedTV page explains, however, it drug may work by affecting certain calcium channels in the brain. A link to more information is also included.
  • How Does Topamax Work?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, Topamax helps treat seizures and prevent migraines by slowing down the abnormal electrical signals in the brain. This page further discusses how Topamax works and describes what it is approved to treat.
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