Epilepsy Articles A-Z

Diazepam Medication Information - Epilepsy Surgery

This page contains links to eMedTV Epilepsy Articles containing information on subjects from Diazepam Medication Information to Epilepsy Surgery. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Diazepam Medication Information
    Diazepam is used for treating anxiety, seizures, muscle spasms, and alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV Web page offers more information about the prescription medication diazepam, including details on how the drug works and what side effects may occur.
  • Diazepam Medicine
    As a type of benzodiazepine medicine, diazepam can help treat conditions such as anxiety and seizures. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at diazepam, including information on how it works and why it may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Diazepam Oral
    Diazepam is a medication used to treat anxiety, seizures, and certain other conditions. As this eMedTV page explains, there are three different forms of diazepam: oral liquid, tablets, and injections. The drug is usually taken three or four times a day.
  • Diazepam Overdose
    Immediate medical attention is necessary for a diazepam overdose, as it may lead to serious complications. This eMedTV page lists possible overdose symptoms (such as confusion and drowsiness) and describes various treatment options that are available.
  • Diazepam Reactions
    Some people can experience negative diazepam reactions, such as nausea or blurry vision. This eMedTV page lists other side effects that may occur with the drug, including potentially serious problems that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Diazepam Safety
    As this eMedTV page explains, you may not be able to take diazepam safely if you have medical conditions such as glaucoma or depression. This page further discusses other safety precautions to be aware of, including possible side effects of diazepam.
  • More About Diazepam Side Effects
    Shakiness and blurred vision are among the possible side effects of diazepam. This eMedTV resource lists both common and serious side effects and describes what to do if you have any serious side effects (such as hostility, aggression, or rage).
  • Diazepam Tablets
    Diazepam is a prescription benzodiazepine medication that comes in tablet, liquid, and injectable forms. This eMedTV segment lists the various strengths of diazepam tablets and offers general information on when and how to take this medicine.
  • Diazepam Withdraw
    As this eMedTV page explains, stopping diazepam too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as vomiting and hallucinations. Ways in which symptoms can be minimized are described. Diazepam withdraw is a common misspelling of diazepam withdrawal.
  • Diazepam Withdrawal Symptoms
    Stopping diazepam too quickly can cause serious withdrawal reactions. This article from the eMedTV archives offers an overview of possible diazepam withdrawal symptoms, as well as information on how your doctor may help you avoid these problems.
  • Diazepam Withdrawl
    If you stop taking diazepam too quickly, withdrawal symptoms often occur. This eMedTV page lists possible symptoms of withdrawal from diazepam and explains how they can be avoided. Diazepam withdrawl is a common misspelling of diazepam withdrawal.
  • Diazipam
    People with muscle spasms or alcohol withdrawal symptoms may benefit from taking diazepam. This eMedTV resource provides a brief overview of this drug and offers a link to more information. Diazipam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Diazpam
    A doctor may prescribe diazepam to treat anxiety, alcohol withdrawal, muscle spasms, or seizures. This eMedTV article discusses these and other uses of diazepam, as well as when and how to take the drug. Diazpam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Dilantan
    Dilantin is a prescription drug used to treat some types of epileptic seizures. This eMedTV page covers the types of seizures that can be controlled with Dilantin and lists some side effects of the drug. Dilantan is a common misspelling of Dilantin.
  • Dilanten
    Dilantin is a prescription drug licensed for treating certain kinds of epileptic seizures. This eMedTV page lists the various Dilantin products that are available, as well as a few side effects of the drug. Dilanten is a common misspelling of Dilantin.
  • Dilantin
    Dilantin is a prescription drug used to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. This eMedTV page further explores the specific uses of Dilantin, offers dosing tips for the drug, and lists side effects that it may potentially cause.
  • Dilantin Alternatives
    Dilantin alternatives may include a special diet, surgery, and other seizure medications. This part of the eMedTV archives lists various medication alternatives to Dilantin and provides links to more information on epilepsy surgery and diet.
  • Dilantin and Alcohol
    It is generally recommended that you avoid drinking alcohol while taking Dilantin. As this eMedTV page explains, combing Dilantin and alcohol can increase the risk and severity of side effects and reduce the drug's effectiveness.
  • Dilantin and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Dilantin does not recommend breastfeeding while taking the drug. This page on the eMedTV site discusses Dilantin and breastfeeding in more detail and explains the risks involved with using the medication while breastfeeding.
  • Dilantin and Insomnia
    It is possible to develop insomnia while taking Dilantin. This eMedTV article offers more information on Dilantin and insomnia, and lists some suggestions for improving sleep habits (like going to sleep and waking up at the same times each day).
  • Dilantin and Pregnancy
    Dilantin may potentially cause problems to a fetus when taken during pregnancy. This eMedTV article offers more information on Dilantin and pregnancy, and explains how to safely take the drug if your doctor recommends taking it while pregnant.
  • Dilantin and Weight Gain
    Weight gain is not a reported side effect of Dilantin. This page on the eMedTV Web site further discusses Dilantin and weight gain, describes the clinical trials used to determine side effects of the drug, and offers tips for helping with weight gain.
  • Dilantin Dosage
    For those who are taking the tablet form of Dilantin, dosing usually starts at 100 mg three times daily. This eMedTV page offers other dosage information, including guidelines for children and tips on when and how to take the drug safely and effectively.
  • Dilantin Drug Information
    Your healthcare provider may prescribe Dilantin if you have certain types of seizures. This eMedTV Web page gives some basic information on Dilantin, including the specific seizures the drug can treat, who can use it, side effects, and more.
  • Dilantin Drug Interactions
    Among the drugs that can potentially cause Dilantin drug interactions are digoxin, isoniazid, and warfarin. This eMedTV page lists other drugs that may lead to Dilantin interactions and discusses the risks of taking these drugs along with Dilantin.
  • Dilantin for Nerve Pain
    Dilantin can sometimes be used for treating nerve pain. As this eMedTV page explains, since no research has been conducted on the safety or effectiveness of using Dilantin for nerve pain, doctors must prescribe the drug "off-label" for this use.
  • Dilantin Overdose
    Signs of an overdose with Dilantin may include joint pain, lethargy, and low blood pressure. This segment of the eMedTV site describes other symptoms that can occur and lists various treatment options for people who take too much Dilantin.
  • Dilantin Side Affects
    Headaches and insomnia are among the side effects that are possible with Dilantin. This eMedTV page also lists serious Dilantin side effects that you should report to your doctor. Dilantin side affects is a common misspelling of Dilantin side effects.
  • Dilantin Side Effects
    Common Dilantin side effects may include slurred speech, confusion, and unusual eye movements. This eMedTV article lists other possible side effects seen with the drug, including potentially serious side effects that require prompt medical attention.
  • Dilantin Toxicity
    Symptoms of Dilantin toxicity may include dizziness, difficulty speaking or slurred speech, and lethargy. This eMedTV Web page lists other signs that may indicate Dilantin toxicity and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Dilantin Uses
    Dilantin is used for treating certain types of epileptic seizures in both adults and children. This eMedTV resource lists specific types of seizures that can be controlled with the drug and discusses possible "off-label" Dilantin uses.
  • Dilantin Warnings and Precautions
    Since Dilantin affects the way your body deals with vitamin D, it may potentially cause bone weakness. This eMedTV segment covers other Dilantin warnings and precautions, and includes information on who should not take the medication.
  • Dilantin Withdrawal
    It is not recommended that you stop taking Dilantin suddenly, as withdrawal symptoms may potentially occur. This eMedTV page covers the possible dangers of Dilantin withdrawal and explains how your doctor may help prevent withdrawals from the medicine.
  • Dilanton
    Dilantin is a medicine used for treating certain kinds of seizures in people with epilepsy. This eMedTV page describes various forms of Dilantin that are available and briefly explains how the drug works. Dilanton is a common misspelling of Dilantin.
  • Dizapam
    Diazepam is a medication often used to treat seizures, anxiety, muscle spasms, and alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV page explains how the medication works for these conditions and describes its effects. Dizapam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Dizepam
    Diazepam is a prescription drug approved to treat seizures, muscle spasms, and other conditions. This eMedTV article lists some of these other conditions and briefly explains how the medication works. Dizepam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Drug Interactions With Diazepam
    Among the drugs that can potentially interact with diazepam are narcotics, alcohol, and probenecid. This eMedTV article explains how drug interactions with diazepam can raise the risk of side effects like drowsiness, confusion, or memory loss.
  • Drug Interactions With Primidone
    When alcohol, barbiturates, or sleep medications are taken with primidone, drug interactions can occur. This eMedTV article discusses these and other drug interactions with primidone, including some of the possible side effects that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Topomax
    Medicines that may react with Topamax include digoxin and lithium. This eMedTV page covers the possible effects of Topamax drug interactions. Drug interactions with Topomax is a common misspelling and variation of Topamax drug interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Valproic Acid
    This eMedTV Web page explains how drug interactions with valproic acid can change the medication levels in the blood or increase the risk of side effects. Rifampin and warfarin are among the drugs that can potentially interact with valproic acid.
  • Dylantin
    Dilantin, a prescription drug, is used for treating certain kinds of epileptic seizures. This eMedTV Web page further describes the drug, discusses specific Dilantin uses, and links to more information. Dylantin is a common misspelling of Dilantin.
  • Dylantin Side Effects
    Dilantin side effects may include muscle coordination problems, confusion, and slurred speech. This eMedTV article also lists less common but potentially dangerous side effects. Dylantin side effects is a common misspelling of Dilantin side effects.
  • Effects of Diazepam
    As this eMedTV page explains, diazepam is a prescription drug used to treat conditions such as anxiety, seizures, and alcohol withdrawal. This page takes a closer look at the effects of diazepam, including detail on how it works and possible side effects.
  • Effects of Klonopin
    Klonopin is a benzodiazepine medication that has anxiety-reducing effects. This segment from the eMedTV Web site describes the other effects of Klonopin, discusses specific uses of this medicine in more detail, and explains how the drug works.
  • Effects of Lamictal
    As this eMedTV Web segment explains, Lamictal is a prescription medication used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder. This page takes a closer look at the effects of Lamictal, including detail on how it affects certain parts of the brain.
  • Effects of Lyrica
    Lyrica is a prescription drug licensed for the treatment of fibromyalgia, nerve pain, and partial seizures. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at the specific effects of Lyrica for these various medical conditions.
  • Effects of Neurontin
    As this eMedTV page explains, Neurontin is a prescription medication used to treat epilepsy and nerve pain caused by shingles. This page takes a closer look at the effects of Neurontin, including how it may work and possible side effects.
  • Effects of Topamax
    As this eMedTV page explains, Topamax is a prescription drug used to treat epileptic seizures and prevent migraine headaches. This page takes a closer look at the effectiveness of Topamax, including how it works and possible side effects.
  • Epalepsy
    As this portion of the eMedTV archives explains, epilepsy is a brain disorder that is caused when nerve cells in the brain signal abnormally. This page explains how to diagnose and treat the disorder. Epalepsy is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epelepsi
    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that can cause seizures. This eMedTV Web page further defines epilepsy, explores the causes of this condition, and explains what treatment options are available for seizures. Epelepsi is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epelepsy
    This eMedTV article covers epilepsy, a condition in which people experience seizures and strange behavior (among other things) because of disruptions in the normal pattern of neuron activity in the brain. Epelepsy is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epilapsy
    Epilepsy is a disorder in which neurons in brain fire abnormally, causing seizures. This eMedTV resource briefly defines epilepsy and provides a link to more in-depth information. Epilapsy is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epilepsey
    Epilepsy is a condition affecting the brain that results in altered states of consciousness and seizures. This eMedTV resource explains what causes it, describes treatment options, and offers a prognosis. Epilepsey is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epilepsi
    Epilepsy is more commonly known as a seizure disorder. This article from the eMedTV site describes the effects of epilepsy, explores the causes of this brain disorder, and explains how it can be treated. Epilepsi is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epilepsie
    Epilepsy is a condition that occurs when neurons in the brain signal abnormally. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes the effects of this disorder and explains how seizures can be controlled. Epilepsie is a common misspelling of epilepsy.
  • Epilepsy
    A person is said to have epilepsy when he or she has had two or more seizures. As this eMedTV article explains, epilepsy occurs when neurons in the brain signal abnormally. This page offers an overview of this brain disorder.
  • Epilepsy and Driving
    It can be very dangerous to drive if you have epilepsy. As this eMedTV article explains, the laws vary from state to state, but most states have rules about how long people have to be seizure-free before they can drive. This segment takes a closer look.
  • Epilepsy and Pregnancy
    Most women with epilepsy are able to become pregnant and give birth to normal, healthy babies. This eMedTV resource provides details about epilepsy and pregnancy, including several important recommendations for those who are considering pregnancy.
  • Epilepsy Diagnosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, tests that are used to diagnose epilepsy include brain scans, blood tests, and an EEG (electroencephalogram). This page takes an in-depth look at how doctors go about diagnosing this condition.
  • Epilepsy Diet
    A diet that is rich in fats and low in carbohydrates may help with epilepsy. This eMedTV article explains how, in some cases, this diet (also known as the ketogenic diet) has been shown to help control seizures in children.
  • Epilepsy Info
    Are you looking for info on epilepsy? Check out this eMedTV Web page. In it, we take a look at the effects of this disorder, what causes it, and what you can expect with treatment, with a link to an in-depth article on this topic.
  • Epilepsy Information
    This part of the eMedTV Web site provides important information on epilepsy, a brain disorder in which neurons in the brain sometimes fire abnormally. This article also covers the history of epilepsy and offers statistics on who the condition affects.
  • Epilepsy Medication
    Drugs are usually the best way to control seizures caused by epilepsy. This eMedTV Web page discusses several different medications for epilepsy and stresses the importance of following a doctor's directions when discontinuing treatment.
  • Epilepsy Research
    As this eMedTV page explains, epilepsy research is currently focused on improving understanding of the brain and exploring new treatment options. This article discusses a variety of research studies on this condition, with information on the findings.
  • Epilepsy Surgery
    As this eMedTV page explains, surgery for epilepsy is generally recommended only after two or three different medications have failed to control seizures. Surgery may also be recommended if a brain lesion is thought to be causing the seizures.
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