Epilepsy Articles A-Z

Carbatrol and Dry Mouth - Diazepam Indications

This page contains links to eMedTV Epilepsy Articles containing information on subjects from Carbatrol and Dry Mouth to Diazepam Indications. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Carbatrol and Dry Mouth
    This eMedTV Web page offers some things you can try if you are taking Carbatrol and dry mouth becomes a problem. Suggestions include sipping water or sugarless drinks during meals and avoiding alcohol and caffeine, among other things.
  • Carbatrol and Hair Loss
    There are several potential side effects of Carbatrol, and hair loss appears to be one of them. This eMedTV segment explains what your healthcare provider might recommend if you are taking Carbatrol and hair loss becomes a problem.
  • Carbatrol and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, studies on Carbatrol and pregnancy (in both animals and humans) showed that the drug can cause birth defects, such as head deformities and heart defects, in babies who were exposed to the medication during pregnancy.
  • Carbatrol Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended Carbatrol dosage for treating epilepsy in adults and children age 12 and older is 200 mg, taken twice daily. This page also offers dosing guidelines when using the drug to treat trigeminal neuralgia.
  • Carbatrol Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on the drug Carbatrol? This page of the eMedTV site provides a brief look at this product, including what it is used for, how it works, and dosing guidelines. Important safety considerations are also addressed.
  • Carbatrol Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page outlines some of the medicines that can potentially cause Carbatrol drug interactions, including antidepressants, other seizure medications, and alcohol. This page also explains the problems these drug interactions can cause.
  • Carbatrol for Bipolar Disorder
    As this eMedTV page explains, many doctors may prescribe Carbatrol for bipolar disorder treatment, even though the drug is not approved for this use. This page explores this off-label use of Carbatrol and discusses the research that has been done.
  • Carbatrol Overdose
    Vomiting, a rapid heart rate, and difficulty breathing are possible signs of a Carbatrol overdose. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other possible overdose symptoms and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Carbatrol Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported Carbatrol side effects include drowsiness, nausea, and dizziness. This eMedTV resource examines both common and rare side effects of the drug, including those that should be reported immediately to your doctor.
  • Carbatrol Uses
    Carbatrol is primarily used for the treatment of seizures and trigeminal neuralgia. This portion of the eMedTV archives also describes some of the off-label Carbatrol uses (such as treating dementia and bipolar disorder) and its use in children.
  • Carbatrol Warnings and Precautions
    Carbatrol can cause serious cases of anemia and can make seizures worse. This eMedTV resource provides other important Carbatrol warnings and precautions that you should be aware of before starting the drug, including those who should not take it.
  • Carbatrol Withdrawal
    The most common symptom of Carbatrol withdrawal is seizures. This eMedTV resource discusses when withdrawal symptoms may occur and explains the importance of not stopping the medication without your healthcare provider's approval and supervision.
  • Carbetrol
    Carbatrol can be prescribed to treat various types of epileptic seizures and trigeminal neuralgia. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and describes some factors that may affect your dosage. Carbetrol is a common misspelling of Carbatrol.
  • Carbitrol
    Carbatrol is a prescription drug used to treat various types of seizures and trigeminal neuralgia. This eMedTV page describes Carbatrol in more detail and offers general precautions for those taking it. Carbitrol is a common misspelling of Carbatrol.
  • Carbotrol Side Effects
    Common Carbatrol side effects include nausea, vomiting, and unsteadiness. This eMedTV page also lists rare side effects and serious side effects that require medical attention. Carbotrol side effects is a common misspelling of Carbatrol side effects.
  • Carbtrol
    This eMedTV page explains how the prescription drug Carbatrol works to treat epileptic seizures and trigeminal neuralgia. This page also describes common side effects seen with the drug. Carbtrol is a common misspelling of Carbatrol.
  • Cause of Epilepsy
    The cause of epilepsy may be head trauma, poisoning, or one of many other possible causes. This eMedTV article explores factors that can cause this disorder and explains the role that genetics may play in the development of epilepsy.
  • Cepra
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Keppra to treat partial, myoclonic, or "grand mal" seizures. This eMedTV page explains some factors that may affect your dosage and provides some general dosing information. Cepra is a common misspelling of Keppra.
  • Clonapin
    Klonopin, a drug used to treat panic disorder and epileptic seizures, works by affecting brain chemicals. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the drug and offers some general dosing guidelines. Clonapin is a common misspelling of Klonopin.
  • Clonipin
    This eMedTV article explains that Klonopin works to treat epileptic seizures and panic disorder by affecting certain brain chemicals. This page also covers dosing, side effects, and overdose symptoms. Clonipin is a common misspelling of Klonopin.
  • Clonipine
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site features a brief overview of Klonopin, a prescription drug that is used to treat certain types of epileptic seizures and panic disorder. Clonipine is a common misspelling of Klonopin.
  • Clonopan
    Klonopin is a medicine approved to treat epileptic seizures and panic disorder. This eMedTV article explains how Klonopin works and lists the specific types of seizures that can be treated with this drug. Clonopan is a common misspelling of Klonopin.
  • Clonopin
    Klonopin is a drug that is used to treat certain types of seizures and panic disorder. This eMedTV segment offers a brief description of the drug and explains the factors that may affect your dosage. Clonopin is a common misspelling of Klonopin.
  • Colonapin
    As this eMedTV page explains, Klonopin is a prescription drug that can treat conditions such as epileptic seizures and panic disorder. This page offers a brief overview of dosing tips and side effects. Colonapin is a common misspelling of Klonopin.
  • Colonipin
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Klonopin to treat epileptic seizures or panic disorder. This part of the eMedTV library explores some side effects of Klonopin and offers general dosing information. Colonipin is a common misspelling of Klonopin.
  • Depacote ER
    Depakote ER is a prescription drug that is used to treat epilepsy and mania, and to prevent migraines. This eMedTV article explains how Depakote ER works and offers dosing information for the drug. Depacote ER is a common misspelling of Depakote ER.
  • Depakote ER
    People who suffer from migraines, epilepsy, or symptoms of mania can often benefit from Depakote ER. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at this prescription drug and its uses, effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Depakote ER and Insomnia
    Insomnia is a potential side effect that may occur with the use of Depakote ER. This part of the eMedTV library offers more information on Depakote ER and insomnia, including a list of suggestions for helping to improve sleep habits.
  • Depakote ER and Weight Gain
    Weight gain is a side effect that occurs in between 1 percent and 5 percent of people taking Depakote ER. This eMedTV resource discusses Depakote ER and weight gain in more detail and offers tips for helping with unexplained weight gain.
  • Depakote ER Dosage
    The suggested Depakote ER dosage for migraine prevention is 500 mg once a day. This eMedTV Web page also contains Depakote ER dosing recommendations for the treatment of epilepsy and mania, and offers tips and precautions for taking the drug.
  • Depakote ER Drug Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Depakote ER is an extended-release drug used for many uses, including the prevention of migraines. This page offers more information on Depakote ER, including what to discuss with your doctor before taking this drug.
  • Depakote ER Drug Interactions
    Felbamate and aspirin are among the drugs that can potentially lead to Depakote ER drug interactions. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that should be used cautiously with Depakote ER and explains what may happen during an interaction.
  • Depakote ER Side Effects
    Common side effects of Depakote ER may include vomiting, drowsiness, and infections. This page on the eMedTV site lists other common side effects of the drug and describes potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Depakote ER Uses
    Depakote ER is used for the treatment of epilepsy and mania, and for the prevention of migraines. This eMedTV page discusses Depakote ER uses in more detail, lists common "off-label" uses for the drug, and explains whether it can be used in children.
  • Depakote ER Warnings and Precautions
    Depakote ER can cause pancreatitis, which may be very dangerous. This section of the eMedTV archives contains more Depakote ER warnings and precautions, including other possible side effects that may occur and information on who should avoid the drug.
  • Diacepam
    A doctor may prescribe diazepam along with other drugs to help treat seizures. This eMedTV Web page discusses other diazepam uses, explains how the drug works, and describes some of its effects. Diacepam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Diastat
    Diastat is a prescription drug that is used in combination with other medications to treat seizures. This eMedTV article discusses the drug in more detail, including information on how it works, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Diastat Rectal Gel
    Diastat rectal gel is a medication used to treat seizures. This eMedTV Web resource briefly describes this medicine, exploring how it works and some of the factors that will affect your dose. Also included is a link to more information.
  • Diastat and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains that if you are taking Diastat and breastfeeding, it is important to know that the drug passes through breast milk. This page explains what side effects to watch for in your nursing child and what many doctors may recommend.
  • Diastat and Pregnancy
    Diastat is typically considered unsafe for use during pregnancy because it may cause birth defects. This eMedTV segment offers an overview of Diastat and pregnancy, explaining why doctors may still prescribe the drug despite the FDA's classification.
  • Diastat Dosage
    Your age and weight are among the factors affecting your Diastat dosage. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains these and other factors that may affect your Diastat dose and offers suggestions on when and how to take the medication.
  • Diastat Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, antidepressants, and narcotics are among the drugs that can potentially interact with Diastat. This eMedTV page describes how Diastat drug interactions can increase your risk of side effects, such as memory problems and difficulty breathing.
  • Diastat Overdose
    This segment of the eMedTV library lists some of the symptoms of a Diastat overdose and describes possible treatment options. It also stresses the importance of seeking immediate medical attention if you think you have overdosed on Diastat.
  • Diastat Side Effects
    Drowsiness, headaches, and diarrhea are a few of the more common side effects seen with Diastat. This eMedTV segment also highlights some of the more serious Diastat side effects that you should report to your doctor right away (such as asthma).
  • Diastat Uses
    Diastat is commonly prescribed to help control seizures during periods of increased activity. This eMedTV Web page provides detailed information on these Diastat uses, including possible off-label uses and giving the medication to children.
  • Diastat Warnings and Precautions
    Diastat can cause breathing problems and has the potential to be abused. This selection of the eMedTV Web site lists other Diastat warnings and precautions, such as the risk of taking it too often and the safety of taking it during pregnancy.
  • Diazapam
    If you have anxiety or muscle spasms, your doctor may prescribe diazepam. This page on the eMedTV site provides detailed information about this prescription drug, as well as a link to more information. Diazapam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Diazapam Dosage
    For people with anxiety, the diazepam dose is usually 2 mg to 10 mg two to four times daily. This eMedTV segment also discusses diazepam dosing in children and the elderly. Diazapam dosage is a common misspelling and variation of diazepam dosing.
  • Diazapem
    Diazepam is a medicine approved to treat numerous conditions, including anxiety and seizures. This eMedTV resource explores other diazepam uses and describes the effects of this drug. Diazapem is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Diazepam
    Diazepam is a prescription drug used to treat seizures, muscle spasms, anxiety, and other conditions. This eMedTV article provides more information about the uses and effects of diazepam, and also covers diazepam dosing guidelines and side effects.
  • Diazepam (Valium) Drug Information
    This eMedTV article offers important information on diazepam (Valium), a drug used to treat conditions such as anxiety, seizures, muscle spasms, and alcohol withdrawal. This page also explains why this drug is not suitable for everyone.
  • Diazepam 10 mg Tablets
    It is recommended that people experiencing alcohol withdrawal start with diazepam 10 mg tablets. This eMedTV page further explains how dosing works for this medicine and includes recommendations for the treatment of anxiety, seizures, and muscle spasms.
  • Diazepam 2 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths available for diazepam, 2 mg tablets are the lowest strength. This Web page found on the eMedTV site includes dosing guidelines for the treatment of anxiety, seizures, muscle spasms, and alcohol withdrawal.
  • Diazepam 5 mg Tablets
    After an initial dose for treating alcohol withdrawal, most people are switched to diazepam 5 mg tablets. This eMedTV resource also provides dosing guidelines when using this drug for the treatment of anxiety, seizures, and muscle spasms.
  • Diazepam Benefits
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library explains, there are several benefits of diazepam, such as reducing anxiety, stopping seizures, and relaxing muscles. This page also explains how the drug works to cause a naturally calming effect.
  • Diazepam Dangers
    Diazepam can cause severe drowsiness and difficulty breathing, which can be life-threatening. This eMedTV page further discusses potential diazepam dangers and lists certain conditions you should tell your doctor about before taking this drug.
  • Diazepam Dosing
    For most people with seizures, the diazepam dosage is 2 mg to 10 mg two to four times daily. This eMedTV Web page also lists dosages for the treatment of other conditions (such as muscle spasms) and covers diazepam dosing in children and the elderly.
  • Diazepam for Anxiety
    Many doctors may prescribe diazepam for anxiety disorders. However, as this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, diazepam is not approved for "everyday anxiety" and is only recommended for short-term use in such cases.
  • Diazepam for Children
    Diazepam is approved for use in children as young as six months old. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses the safety of using diazepam for children and describes some general dosing guidelines when using this medication in this age group.
  • Diazepam for Seizures
    Many doctors may prescribe certain medications in combination with diazepam for seizures. This eMedTV Web page explains how this medicine works for the treatment of seizures and briefly explores other approved uses, with a link to more information.
  • Diazepam Indications
    As this eMedTV page explains, diazepam is a prescription drug used to treat several conditions, such as seizures, anxiety, and alcohol withdrawal. This page takes a closer look at these and other diazepam indications, including possible off-label uses.
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