Epilepsy Articles A-Z

Valproic Acid - Zonegran Withdrawal

This page contains links to eMedTV Epilepsy Articles containing information on subjects from Valproic Acid to Zonegran Withdrawal. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Valproic Acid
    Valproic acid is often prescribed to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. This eMedTV Web page further discusses this prescription drug, including information on its effects, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Valproic Acid and Breastfeeding
    While valproic acid passes through breast milk, the risk of harm to the breastfed infant is probably low. This eMedTV page explores valproic acid and breastfeeding, explaining what to do if you are breastfeeding and your doctor prescribes the drug.
  • Valproic Acid and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains that studies on valproic acid and pregnancy showed that the drug raised the risk of problems such as birth defects. This page also explains that if you become pregnant while taking it, you should tell your doctor right away.
  • Valproic Acid Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, valproic acid dosing for complex partial seizures can vary from 10 mg to 15 mg per kg of body weight per day. This page also lists factors besides your weight that can affect your dose (like other drugs you're taking).
  • Valproic Acid Drug Information
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on valproic acid, an epilepsy drug. Topics covered in this article include how to use it, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Valproic Acid Overdose
    Drowsiness and a coma are among the symptoms you may experience if you take an overdose of valproic acid. This eMedTV page lists other symptoms of a valproic acid overdose, as well as treatment options that are available (such as supportive care).
  • Valproic Acid Side Effects
    When taking valproic acid, side effects can include vomiting, shakiness, and weakness. This eMedTV page also lists serious side effects of the drug that may require immediate medical attention (such as signs of pancreatitis).
  • Valproic Acid Withdrawal
    Abruptly stopping valproic acid can increase the risk of seizures in some people. This eMedTV resource provides more information about valproic acid withdrawal symptoms and what steps your doctor may take to help keep them from occurring.
  • Vimpat
    Vimpat is a medication prescribed to treat partial seizures. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes an in-depth look at how the drug works and further explores its effects, potential side effects, general precautions, and dosage information.
  • Vimpat and Breastfeeding
    Vimpat does pass through breast milk in rats. This eMedTV page explains the manufacturer's advice for breastfeeding women to avoid Vimpat and describes why your doctor may still recommend taking this seizure medicine if you are nursing a child.
  • Vimpat and Pregnancy
    Vimpat (lacosamide) may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This portion of the eMedTV library describes the results of animal studies on pregnancy and Vimpat, explaining how the medication increased the risk of fetal death and neurological problems.
  • Vimpat Dosage
    This eMedTV Web article explains that the typical starting dosage of Vimpat for treating partial seizures is 50 mg twice daily. This page further discusses the drug's dosages and also offers tips on when and how to use this medication.
  • Vimpat Drug Interactions
    When Vimpat is taken with certain other medicines, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV resource offers more information on interactions with Vimpat, including which medicines may interfere with Vimpat and the negative effects of these interactions.
  • Vimpat Medication Information
    Available in the form of a tablet, Vimpat is a drug used to treat seizures. This eMedTV segment offers a quick overview of this prescription medication, including a link to more detailed information.
  • Vimpat Overdose
    You should seek immediate medical attention if you have overdosed on Vimpat (lacosamide). This eMedTV Web page covers what to do if you believe you have taken too much of this drug and describes various treatment options that are available.
  • Vimpat Side Effects
    Dizziness, nausea, and vomiting are among the most common side effects seen with Vimpat. This eMedTV Web segment highlights other possible side effects and explains which side effects may require immediate medical attention.
  • Vimpat Uses
    Vimpat is a medication that is used for treating partial seizures in people age 17 years old and older. This eMedTV Web resource discusses the uses of Vimpat in more detail, including information on how it works and possible off-label uses of the drug.
  • Vimpat Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page lists important warnings and precautions with Vimpat, such as those relating to the drug's safety during pregnancy and the risk of suddenly stopping Vimpat. This page also discusses what you should tell your doctor prior to taking Vimpat.
  • What Does Diazepam Treat?
    Diazepam is approved to treat alcohol withdrawal, anxiety, muscle spasms, and seizures. This eMedTV article further addresses the question, "What does diazepam treat?" This page also covers off-label uses and explains how the medication works.
  • What Does Klonopin Treat?
    Klonopin is known to have anxiety-reducing and muscle-relaxing effects, but what does it treat? As this eMedTV page explains, Klonopin is used to treat panic disorder and many types of epileptic seizures, such as akinetic and absence seizures.
  • What Does Topamax Treat?
    Topamax is used to treat epileptic seizures in children and adults, and prevent migraines in adults. This eMedTV Web resource further explores conditions Topamax treats and covers possible off-label uses, with a link to more information.
  • What Is Diazepam Prescribed For?
    This eMedTV Web page explains that diazepam is prescribed for a variety of conditions, including alcohol withdrawal, anxiety, muscle spasms, and seizures. This page also explains how the drug works and offers a link to more information.
  • What Is Diazepam Used For?
    Anxiety and seizures are among the conditions that diazepam can treat. This eMedTV article describes these diazepam uses in more detail, and also discusses how the drug can be used for off-label purposes (such as for treating agitation or insomnia).
  • What Is Epilepsy?
    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that results in different types of seizures. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at this condition, with information on its types, symptoms, treatment options, and educational implications.
  • What Is Klonopin Prescribed For?
    Many people may have heard of Klonopin but may still wonder, "What is it prescribed for?" This eMedTV Web page offers information on what the drug is prescribed for and also explains how this medication can be used for "off-label" purposes.
  • What Is Klonopin Used For?
    Klonopin is known to reduce anxiety and produce various other effects. This eMedTV Web page answers the question, "What is Klonopin used for?" by explaining how the drug is licensed to treat panic disorder and certain types of epileptic seizures.
  • What Is Lamictal Used For?
    Lamictal is licensed to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on what Lamictal is used for, including its use as a mood stabilizer to treat bipolar disorder.
  • What Is Lyrica Used For?
    This eMedTV resource explains that Lyrica is used for treating several conditions, such as postherpetic neuralgia, epilepsy, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and fibromyalgia. A link to more detailed information on these uses is also included.
  • What Is Neurontin Used For?
    As this article from the eMedTV site explains, Neurontin is licensed to treat partial seizures (when used along with other seizure medications) and postherpetic neuralgia. This article takes a closer look at the uses of Neurontin.
  • What Is Primidone Used For?
    Primidone is used for treating certain epileptic seizures (grand mal and partial) in adults and children. This eMedTV Web page explains how primidone works to treat these conditions and describes some off-label primidone uses.
  • What Is Topamax Prescribed For?
    This segment of the eMedTV library explains that Topamax is often prescribed to treat seizures and prevent migraines. This page also lists off-label uses of the drug and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • What Is Topamax Used For?
    Topamax is known to have effects on the nervous system, but what is Topamax used for, exactly? As this eMedTV Web page explains, this medication is used to prevent migraines and treat epilepsy (it can be used alone or with other seizure medicines).
  • What Is Valproic Acid Used For?
    Valproic acid may be used for the treatment of partial seizures or absence seizures in people with epilepsy. This eMedTV segment further discusses valproic acid uses, including possible off-label uses of the medication (such as treating hiccups).
  • When Does Diazepam Start Working?
    This eMedTV page takes a look at when diazepam starts working. As this page explains, the drug is typically taken three or four times a day and the effects are usually felt right away. This article also offers tips for when and how to use this medicine.
  • When Does Klonopin Start Working?
    Klonopin is claimed to be effective for treating seizures and panic disorder -- when does it start working? This eMedTV Web page discusses Klonopin's dosing information in more detail and provides a link to more information.
  • When Does Lyrica Start Working?
    You may be wondering, "When does Lyrica start working?" As this eMedTV page explains, some people taking Lyrica for nerve pain or fibromyalgia during clinical studies experienced an improvement in their symptoms within one week of starting treatment.
  • When Does Topamax Start Working?
    This eMedTV page takes a look at when Topamax starts working. As this page explains, the drug is typically started at a low dosage and then slowly increased over a period of several weeks. This article also offers some general dosing tips and guidelines.
  • Zarontin
    Zarontin is a medication used to treat certain epileptic seizures called absence seizures. This eMedTV article discusses Zarontin in more detail, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to take the drug.
  • Zarontin and Breastfeeding
    Zarontin does pass through breast milk in women. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains what to do if you are taking Zarontin and breastfeeding at the same time, and why many healthcare providers consider the drug to be safe when nursing.
  • Zarontin and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to take Zarontin during pregnancy. This eMedTV article explores Zarontin and pregnancy, explaining how the FDA has classified Zarontin as a pregnancy Category C medicine and outlining some of the complications Zarontin may cause.
  • Zarontin Dosage
    The recommended starting Zarontin dosage for adults and children (age six and older) is 250 mg twice daily. This eMedTV page also discusses Zarontin dosing guidelines for children younger than six years old, and offers tips on taking the medication.
  • Zarontin Drug Information
    This eMedTV article contains information on Zarontin, a drug used to treat a certain type of seizure. This resource explores side effects, dosing guidelines, and more. Also included is a link to more in-depth information.
  • Zarontin Drug Interactions
    Certain antibiotics and seizure medications can cause drug interactions with Zarontin. This eMedTV page describes how these and other Zarontin drug interactions can alter the levels of some drugs in your blood and increase your risk of side effects.
  • Zarontin Overdose
    This eMedTV resource covers some of the symptoms of a Zarontin overdose (such as difficulty breathing and vomiting). This page also describes some of the treatment options that are available for a recent overdose or an overdose that was not recent.
  • Zarontin Side Effects
    Nausea, a loss of appetite, and weight loss are a few of the more common side effects seen with Zarontin. This eMedTV segment also explores some of the more serious Zarontin side effects that you should report to your healthcare provider right away.
  • Zarontin Uses
    Zarontin uses include treating complex and simple absence seizures in adults and children. This eMedTV resource provides information on the types of seizures that the drug can be used to treat, and discusses Zarontin use in children.
  • Zarontin Warnings and Precautions
    Zarontin has been reported to cause lupus and can make liver or kidney problems worse. This eMedTV segment lists other Zarontin warnings and precautions, such as the safety of stopping the drug suddenly or taking it while pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Zarontin Withdrawal
    Zarontin can increase your risk of seizures if you suddenly stop taking the medication. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains the symptoms of a Zarontin withdrawal in more detail and describes how your doctor may recommend stopping the drug.
  • Zonagram
    Available by prescription, Zonegran is a medication that is used to control partial seizures. This eMedTV segment offers a brief description of the drug, with information on its effects in the brain. Zonagram is a common misspelling of Zonegran.
  • Zonagran
    Zonegran is a drug that is used to control a specific type of seizure. This page of the eMedTV Web site briefly describes the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Zonagran is a common misspelling of Zonegran.
  • Zonegram
    Used to control partial seizures, Zonegran is a drug that is generally taken once or twice a day. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of the medication and provides a link to more information. Zonegram is a common misspelling of Zonegran.
  • Zonegran
    Zonegran is a prescription medicine that is used to control partial seizures. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth look at the drug, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Zonegran Alternatives
    Drugs that are used as an alternative to Zonegran include Lyrica, Dilantin, and Lamictal. This eMedTV Web page talks about these and other Zonegran alternatives, including an explanation of when they might become necessary.
  • Zonegran and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page takes a look at the results of research studies on Zonegran and breastfeeding. It explains that while the drug passes through breast milk in women, it is not known if this causes negative effects in nursing infants.
  • Zonegran and Dry Mouth
    Occurring in up to 2 percent of patients in studies, dry mouth is a possible side effect of Zonegran. This eMedTV article further discusses Zonegran and dry mouth, including tips on how to relieve this common side effect.
  • Zonegran and Pregnancy
    Zonegran is considered a pregnancy Category C medication by the FDA. This eMedTV resource offers a detailed look at Zonegran and pregnancy, including the results of studies that looked at the effects of the drug in pregnant animals.
  • Zonegran and Weight Loss
    Weight loss is a common side effect of Zonegran. This eMedTV selection offers a discussion on this side effect, with statistics on how frequently weight loss occurs and what to do if you notice this problem during treatment.
  • Zonegran Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended starting Zonegran dosage for partial seizures is 100 mg, taken once daily for the first two weeks. This article discusses Zonegran dosing in detail, with tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Zonegran Drug Information
    This page of the eMedTV Web site provides a brief overview of Zonegran, a drug used to treat partial seizures. There is information on how this medicine works, how often it is taken, and possible side effects, with a link to learn more.
  • Zonegran Drug Interactions
    Luminal, Mysoline, and Epitol are a few of the drugs that can interact with Zonegran. This eMedTV segment features a list of other Zonegran drug interactions, with information on the negative effects that can occur as a result.
  • Zonegran Overdose
    Symptoms of a Zonegran overdose include difficulty breathing, slow heart rate, and low blood pressure. This eMedTV segment discusses the effects of a Zonegran overdose and explains some of the treatment options that are available.
  • Zonegran Side Effects
    Common side effects of Zonegran include headaches, nausea, and drowsiness, among others. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed list of common and uncommon side effects of this drug, including the ones requiring immediate medical attention.
  • Zonegran Uses
    Zonegran is used for controlling partial seizures in people with epilepsy. This eMedTV selection gives an overview of Zonegran uses, including information on "off-label" uses for the drug, such as treating other types of seizures.
  • Zonegran Warnings and Precautions
    As with all seizure medications, Zonegran should not be stopped suddenly. This segment of the eMedTV Web site presents several Zonegran warnings and precautions, including detailed information on who should avoid the drug.
  • Zonegran Withdrawal
    Suddenly stopping Zonegran can increase your risk of seizures. This selection from the eMedTV archives gives an overview of Zonegran withdrawal, including ways to reduce your risk of seizures and other withdrawal symptoms.
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